Spydus Search Results - Bayside Cultural Collection https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?QRY=BIBITM%3E%20ITMCOLX%3A%20(BCC)&QRYTEXT=Bayside%20Cultural%20Collection&SETLVL=SET&CF=BIB&SORTS=DTE.DATE1.DESC&NRECS=20 Spydus Search Results en © Civica Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212510&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Ridgeway Sterling Pottery<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212511&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable" . Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable" .<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212512&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>DenbyA. College<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212513&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Royal DoultonArtist Barbara Vernon<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212514&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Staffordshire Vitrock<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212515&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Industria Argentina<br />Teapot Cup.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212516&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212517&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212518&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Arabia Finlandia<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212519&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Royal Doulton<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212520&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212521&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Moytt<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212522&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Devon Motto Ware<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212523&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212524&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212525&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212526&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212527&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212528&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Wedgwood of Etruria<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212529&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Davison Newman & Co Ltd<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212530&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Johnson Bros<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212531&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Globe Pottery Co<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212532&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>SJB<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212533&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Sadlers<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212534&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>SJB<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212535&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Staffordshire Shorter & Son Ltd<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212536&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212537&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Coalport<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212538&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br /> Teapot https://bayside.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/ENQ/WPAC/BIBENQ?SETLVL=&BRN=212539&CF=BIB Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable". Scope and content: In 1983, local resident Edmund James Wright Albury bequeathed his eclectic collection of 150 teapots to Brighton Council, alongside a 'teapot diary' which described each of the teapots in great detail. As an introduction to his diary, Edmund wrote: "Tea, the drink that stimulates but does not inebriate. And here are some pots to make it in. It is not a collection of valuable pieces. Nothing from Bow, Chelsea or Coalport in here. There is one Lowestoft pot which can be reliably stated to be 1790. Otherwise the collection is an assortment of all shapes and sizes, made in many countries and brought together over a period of 25 years up to 1971. Lovers of fine china and porcelain will not find more than one or two pots to please them. What value there is in the collection lies in its being brought, and kept, together. It represents the ideas of three or four generations of tea drinkers for the design of their teapots for practical and commonplace use in the home. A few oddities and novelties in it are most impractical, but it takes all sorts to make a collection. The points of a good teapot are interesting to note. It should have good 'balance' of design from the sprout, through the body to the handle, it should be easy and comfortable, and, above all, it must be a good pourer. Make it carefully, hot and strong. It will be for your comfort always. Even wars, good fortune and bad, hard labour and idle time will be bearable".<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Author: </span>Maker unknown<br />Teapot.<br /><span style="font-weight:bold;">Image available online</span><br />